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Resources for children

Bibles, books, films, videos

Bibles and Bible Stories

Books, bibles, Youtube videos

The Bible is foundational to the understanding of Christianity in most traditions, and the place where we encounter the captivating personality of Jesus.


We recommend weekly engagement with its stories and message. Bible stories, of varying depth, will be more appropriate for younger children, whereas older children may benefit from a complete children's version of the Bible.


Our recommendations are based on our own subjective opinions, and you should also search for products that you feel will meet the needs of your child.

Diary of a Disciple, Luke's Story

Gemma Willis, Scripture Union

The gospel of Luke retold. My 7 year old daughter loved reading this; the story is portrayed in a vivid, lively style with frequent emphases on certain words, using a variety of fonts. The text is broken up with cartoon-like illustrations and boxes looking at issues in more detail.

A free-to-download video game, produced by Scripture Union. Focussed on the stories about  Jesus found the Gospels. My kids love this!

 

The Lion Children's Bible

Ages 7-12


This well-illustrated book simplifies the Bible stories sufficiently so that my 6-year-old can read them with assistance, yet retains enough substance to be authentic. Well written and a good introduction to the Bible. 

Guardians Of Ancora

Praying with children

There are many ways to pray, whether through silence or singing, drawing or colouring, or simply just speaking your mind. Have a look at the following resources to get ideas.

Illustrated Children's Ministry

Resources to help churches and families engage children in prayer. They have many art products, including those for colouring by children or as a family. Check out their 10 ways to pray with kids!

A wealth of resources for incorporating the journey of faith into the life of the family, this ministry has good advice about making time to pray with your children.

The Methodist Church

Some brief but useful advice from a major protestant denomination.

loyolapress.com

Praying with children from a Catholic perspective, courtesy of the Jesuits.

Series: The Attributes of God for Children, 
William Lane Craig

Learning about the nature of God

These are straightforward books designed to teach basic truths about the nature of God; that he is all-knowing, that He is three persons, is eternal, is Spirit, is everywhere and is self-sufficient. An excellent resource for addressing your children's questions about God.


Each topic is explored through stories about a family; the parents Brown Bear and Red Goose and their children Charity and John. Marli Renee's illustrations are warm and cosy and make the material more accessible. Each story closes with a memory verse.

1) God Is Spirit

Does God have a body? Why can't we see it? Brown Bear and Red Goose help Charity and John look for answers in the Bible.

Apologetics Books for Children

Here we take a look at resources to strengthen the faith of your child by looking at Christian evidences and answering objections.

The Case For Faith For Kids

Strobel, Suggs and Elmer

Zonderkids

Accessible, visually appealing, jocular but genuine, this work is packed with cartoons, stories, question boxes and interviews looking at reasons for faith and coping with doubt. It doesn't pull punches either, especially with the Problem of Evil.

 

The reasons for faith are based on the cosmological, moral and teleological arguments (don't worry, they're not called that in the book) and are explained simply and clearly with appropriate illustrations. The interviews are with William Lane Craig and Ravi Zacharias, so we're in good hands.

 

One of the best aspects is the view of doubt as necessary to the strengthening of faith ("Doubt is the heavy lifting of faith") and the ecouragement to ask questions. Strobel also explains the relationship between faith (as trust) and evidence, and the need to live without full certainty.

Common objections to the faith are considered, such as the problem of evil, the tension between a naturalistic way of looking at the world and the biblical stories of miracles. There is also a sympathetic discussion of other religions with plenty of emphasis on the need to respect the beliefs of others.

The book ends with simplified analysis of different reponses to the call to trust in Jesus. Your options are to be a 'denier', a 'delayer', a 'departer' or a 'delighter'.

As with many popular level apologetics works, the book is unselfconsciously North American in cultural outlook. This is unlikely to be a problem for most western children, though it may grate with an English adult!

I think it's a good start for children to start thinking through the issues around the Christian faith, and recommend it!

My 8 year old daughter has reviewed this book:

What did you learn from it?

I learned that God, although we cannot see him he is always there for us.

What is your best chapter?

Why would a good God allow bad things? It says that we made bad things happen not God.

Would you like other people to read it?

Yes. I think that many people should read it because it is easy to read and has fun cartoon pictures.

I would give it 4 stars out of 5

The Case For Christ For Kids

Strobel, Suggs and Elmer

Zonderkids

A simplified argument for accepting the protrayal of Jesus in the Gospels, based loosely around the 'Lord, Liar, or Lunatic' trilemma.

The evidences are well presented, such as Old Testament prophesies filled by Jesus, but the explanation as to why Jesus wasn't insane might be a bit opaque to an 8 year old, as the reasoning is more subtle.

The Case for Christ for Kids looks at the historical evidences for the Resurrection, including the reality of Jesus' death on the cross, the empty tomb, the post-mortem appearances and the faith of the disciples.

As with the Case for Faith for Kids, the text is punctuated with explanation boxes, cartoons, question boxes and jokes as well as stories and anecdotes.

The stories give instances in which children have opportunities to witness to their friends, or behave in a Christlike manner, and questions invite the reader to consider what they would have said or how they would have acted.

The book is therefore not just about reinforcing the Christian portrayal of Jesus, but highlighting the need for personal commitment in a loving relationship with him. 

A simplified argument for accepting the protrayal of Jesus in the Gospels, based loosely around the 'Lord, Liar, or Lunatic' trilemma.

The evidences are well presented, such as Old Testament prophesies filled by Jesus, but the explanation as to why Jesus wasn't insane might be a bit opaque to an 8 year old, as the reasoning is more subtle.

The Case for Christ for Kids looks at the historical evidences for the Resurrection, including the reality of Jesus' death on the cross, the empty tomb, the post-mortem appearances and the faith of the disciples.

As with the Case for Faith for Kids, the text is punctuated with explanation boxes, cartoons, question boxes and jokes as well as stories and anecdotes.

The stories give instances in which children have opportunities to witness to their friends, or behave in a Christlike manner, and questions invite the reader to consider what they would have said or how they would have acted.

The book is therefore not just about reinforcing the Christian portrayal of Jesus, but highlighting the need for personal commitment in a loving relationship with him. 

The Case For a Creator For Kids

Strobel, Suggs and Elmer

Zonderkids

Continuing the same zany, light hearted format, Case for a Creator plunges into reasons to think that God exists, including the comological argument, the argument from fine tuning and intelligent design in nature. Whilst some of this ground has been covered in Case for Faith, this book goes into greater detail and includes more technical information, being generally focussed on recent advances in science. This is what makes it more compelling but also limits it's accessibility to some extent, as will be seen when the authors try to explain the genetic code and the irriducible complexity of Michael Behe

I think this book is best given to an older pre-teen than the preceding two books in this section, one with some exposure to science lessons and some familiarity with physics.

The book leads with the Kalam Cosmological argument, and explains it well, drawing helpful parrallels between the 'Big Bang' and the opening chapters of Genesis. Likewise, fine tuning is explored from the perspective of Robin Collins and illustrated with the force of gravity and the cosmological constant.

It closes with a discussion about getting to know this creator, and as with the previous titles, gives 4 stories exploring what it might mean to use the material in witnessing to one's friends. Overall, it's a high quality resource, though it covers a lot of technical ground for a children's book.

Cold Case Christianity For Kids

J. Warner Wallace and Susie Wallace, Rob Suggs

"Investigate Jesus with a real detective" reads the tagline, and the book certainly delivers on this. It's a more serious and abstract book that the 'case for...kids' series, using concepts of forensic analysis on the gospel portrayals of Christ. Whilst humour and frivolity are not absent, they are kept to a minimum and it is clear that Wallace clearly intends his readers to take the project seriously and genuinely profit from it. More power to him.

The exploration takes the form of a story about a group of children entering a 'detective academy' and learning to assess evidence with a senior detective. One of them brings a skateboard he found in a shed to their first session, and each chapter the cadets learn new ways of working out whom the skateboard belongs to. Concepts such as avoiding preconceptions, learning to infer, 'thinking circumstantially' and testing witnesses yield information about the skateboard but are also applied to the gospels so that their robust qualities as evidence are highlighted.

There are illustrations as well as text boxes at the side of each page asking questions or giving definitions of key terms.

Because of its serious nature, my 9-year-old was not able to sustain her attention listening to me read it, but perhaps it works best with older children who are using it to study by themselves. 

Moreover, the book is actually one part of a package of materials that includes audiovisual resources. The book references www.coldcasechristianityforkids.com where you can apply to join Wallace's detective academy and where each of the chapters has associated videos and downloadable resources. The adult leader guide to each chapter gives Wallace's intentions behind the presentation of the material and good questions to aid exploration.

This is a serious attempt to present the evidence of the Christian faith to children as part of a well thought out programme. It's a high-quality set of resources that do not depend on frivolity, but for that reason may be less accessible for the easily distracted.